Matters of Scale - Corporations on the Dole

How resource extraction subsidies transfer wealth - from public property to private profit, from natural capital to consumption, and from the many to the few.

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Recoverable mineral value of the McCoy/Cove gold deposit in Nevada, which a Canadian company, Echo Bay Mines, proposes to mine
1448600000
Amount the U.S. government will charge Echo Bay for the rights to take out and sell this gold, even though the land belongs to the U.S. public
3305
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Recoverable mineral value of the Mount Emmons molybdenum deposit in Colorado, for which the Cyprus-Amax company has filed an application
2999200000
Amount the U.S. government will charge Cyprus-Amax for the rights to extract and keep this wealth, even though the land belongs to the U.S. public
1000
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Amount paid by the world's governments to subsidize their fishing industries in one year - creating higher incentives to deplete stocks and risk further extinctions
$54 billion
Amount paid by the fishing industries themselves
$27 billion
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Amount the U.S. government paid to manage publicly owned land used by cattle ranchers for grazing livestock in 1994
$105 million
Amount paid by ranchers for the use of this land, at a rate of $1.61 per month per cow
$29 million
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Amount the U.S. government spent on building and maintaining roads through national forests, largely for the use of timber companies, in 1994
100000000
Amount of this cost paid by the timber companies
0
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Amount spent by Germany to subsidize coal production in one year
$4.9 billion
Market value of coal produced
$1.2 billion
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Sources: Gold and modybdenum: Recoverable mineral value from corporate annual reports as compiled by the Mineral Policy Center, Washington, D.C.; Fishing: Peter Weber, Worldwatch Paper 120, Net Loss: Fish, Jobs, and the Marine Environment, 1994; Cattle and Forests: Common Cause, Fall 1995; Coal: Judy Dempsey, "Decision Time Looms for German Energy," Financial Times, February 9, 1995.