Troubled Waters on Africa's Largest Water Scheme

Katse Dam On June 20, the non-profit organization Environmental Defense hosted a lunch meeting in Washington, D.C., to discuss the shortcomings of Africa’s largest water diversion scheme, the Lesotho Highlands Water Project (LHWP). An outgrowth of a 1986 treaty between South Africa and Lesotho, the project involves the construction of five large dams in Lesotho’s Orange/Senqu River Basin to supply water to South Africa’s industrial Gauteng Province.

Worldwatch Poll - Biofuels are...

* a possible near-term solution to our energy and climate crisis\n* over-hyped; it's not clear how biofuels will contribute to sustainable development\n* a disaster that would drive up food prices and destroy remaining tropical forests\n* not sure\n

World Urban Forum Examines Rapid Growth of Cities

slums In 2007, for the first time in history, more than half the human population will live in urban areas. To discuss the implications of this momentous demographic shift, thousands of delegates from more than 150 countries have gathered in Vancouver, Canada, for World Urban Forum 3.

Climate Change Influences Disaster Trends

katrina satellite image At a May 25–26 workshop in Hohenkammer, Germany, scientists, economists, and insurance analysts agreed that regardless of its underlying causes, climate change has had an increasing influence on disaster trends in recent decades.

In Kenya, Bicycles Leave Taxis in the Dust

Bicycle taxis are rapidly supplanting gasoline-powered minibus taxis in parts of western Kenya. Residents of Kisumu, a small city 500 kilometers from Nairobi, have long relied on the minibuses, or “matatus,” to get around. But as improvements in the bicycle industry lead to lower production costs, sales of the pedal-powered alternatives are booming.

Nuclear Industry: Headed for Meltdown?

Plus, Solar Energy in China, E-Waste, Goldman Prize Profiles, and More in the July/August 2006 issue of World Watch.

The Other Side of Nuclear Waste

mining operationThe residents of Kara Agach, a mountain village in western Kyrgystan, are receiving radiation doses as much as 40 times the internationally recognized safety limit, according to a new study cited in the June 10 issue of New Scientist.

Network Aims to Become First "Wildlife Interpol"

tiger Police and customs officials across Southeast Asia have joined forces to fight illegal international wildlife trade, according to a May 25 announcement by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Wildlife Enforcement Network (ASEAN-WEN) and the United Nations Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).

Transcript: Morning Session - Biofuels For Transportation Conference

CHRISTOPHER FLAVIN: It is a real pleasure to welcome all of you to the Rayburn Building on Capitol Hill here today. My name is Chris Flavin. I’m president of the Worldwatch Institute, and it is our great honor and pleasure to be able to host this event on global biofuels and the potential to meet a variety of needs over the years to come.

Warming Climate Linked to Runaway Blazes in Brazil's Rainforest

forest fireAcre, Brazil’s westernmost state, is preparing for yet another onslaught of out-of-control forest fires following one of its driest rainy seasons in years.
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