Photo Resources: Worldwatch Paper 168: Venture Capitalism for a Tropical Forest: Cocoa inthe Mata Atlantica


Worldwatch Paper 168: Venture Capitalism for a Tropical Forest: Cocoa in the Mata Atlântica
Photos below are for use by the news media only and should be credited as follows: © 2003 Chris Bright/ Worldwatch Institute

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Lead author of Venture Capitalism for a Tropical Forest, Chris Bright,  stands beside a cacao tree in Brazil's Atlantic Forest.
In Brazil, most cocoa is grown within an agroforestry system called "cabruca," in which the overstory is thinned and the understory is planted with cacao trees. As the primary forest has declined, the wildlife value of cabruca has increased.
Cocoa pods growing on a cacao tree in the Brazilian State of Bahia. Harvested cocoa beans before cleaning.
A Brazilian farm worker sorts a pile of freshly harvested cocoa pods. Mules are often used on Brazilian cocoa farms to transport harvested cocoa.
A cacao tree in fruit on an organic cocoa farm in the Brazilian State of Bahia. A Brazilian farm worker dries freshly harvested cocoa beans.
A cacao tree infected with the witches' broom pathogen. During the 1990s, an epidemic of the broom reduced Brazilian cocoa production to about 25 percent of its previous level. Production has since rebounded somewhat. The edge of an old growth forest fragment in the Brazilian cocoa belt.