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WORLDWATCH INSTITUTE URGES WORLD BANK AND FAO TO OVERHAUL MISLEADING FOOD SUPPLY PROJECTIONS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, May 1, 1996

WORLDWATCH INSTITUTE URGES WORLD BANK AND FAO
TO OVERHAUL MISLEADING FOOD SUPPLY PROJECTIONS

Lester R. Brown, President, Worldwatch Institute

INFECTIOUS DISEASES SURGE:ENVIRONMENTAL DESTRUCTION, POVERTY TO BLAME

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6 P.M. EST
Saturday, April 20, 1996

INFECTIOUS DISEASES SURGE:
ENVIRONMENTAL DESTRUCTION, POVERTY TO BLAME

Rates of infectious disease have risen rapidly in many countries during the past

WORLD LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY INDUSTRIES FACING CUTBACKS AS U.S. CORN RUNS LOW

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, April 4, 1996

WORLD LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY INDUSTRIES
FACING CUTBACKS AS U.S. CORN RUNS LOW

Lester R. Brown

On Friday morning, March 29, 1996 the U.S. Department of Agriculture released its Grain

DEVELOPMENT AFFECTING RIVERS AND WETLANDS BOOMERANGS TO CAUSE ECONOMIC AND BIOLOGICAL LOSS

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6 P.M. EST
Saturday, March 23, 1996

DEVELOPMENT AFFECTING RIVERS AND WETLANDS BOOMERANGS TO CAUSE ECONOMIC AND BIOLOGICAL LOSS

A new Worldwatch Paper, Imperiled Waters, Impoverished Future: The

Worldwatch Vital Signs Brief 96-1

Worldwatch Vital Signs Brief 96-1


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, January 25, 1996

REBUILDING WORLD GRAIN STOCKS---THE CHALLENGE OF

WORLDWIDE REPRESSION OF PEACEFUL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTESTORS SPURS NEW COALITIONS WITH HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVISTS

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6 P.M. EST
Saturday, December 9 1995


WORLDWIDE REPRESSION OF PEACEFUL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTESTORS SPURS NEW COALITIONS WITH HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVISTS

ECONOMIC CONVERSION CRUCIAL TO CLAIMING PEACE DIVIDEND

As the Cold War recedes, the world has a unique opportunity to reap sizable peace dividend and to meet pressing social, economic, and environmental needs, according to a new study from Worldwatch Institute.

Apartheid Devastating South African Environment

Apartheid has been as disastrous for South Africa's environment as for its people, according to a new study by the Worldwatch Institute.

"Institutionalized racism has polluted the air and water, pillaged the bedrock, and ripped away the earth in wide regions of South Africa," said Alan B. Durning, author of Apartheid's Environmental Toll and a Senior Researcher at Worldwatch, a Washington, D.C.-based research organization.

Apartheid has turned the "homelands"--where half the black population is forced to live--into ecological wastelands, according to Durning.

To generate the funds the white minority needs to enforce apartheid, Pretoria has allowed mines to ignore common safety and pollution precautions.

A pariah to most oil exporters, South Africa has developed an energy policy that makes it among the most polluting nations of its size.

Last, its wars against neighbors opposed to minority rule have devastated endangered plant and animal species.

"Today, with apartheid's grip on the nation weakening, it is time for a full reckoning of its ecological toll," Durning said.

Under apartheid, half of South Africa's 29 million blacks--primarily women, children, and the elderly--have been pushed onto 13 percent of the national territory euphemistically called "homelands."

"By design, these areas are remote, their topsoil is thin, rainfall scarce and unreliable, and the ground sloping and rocky. Suffering under politically enforced overpopulation--ten times the population density of white rural areas--the homelands are among the world's most degraded regions."

Enormous erosion gullies criss-cross the topography, and in some areas the topsoil has been worn down to bedrock. In 1980, 46 percent of the Ciskei homeland, for instance, was already moderately to severely eroded.

Forests are disappearing rapidly too. The kwaZulu homeland has lost 200 of its 250 distinct tracts of woodland in the past half century. In the homelands as a group, fuelwood gathering outpaced regeneration in the early eighties and will strip the land bare within 30 years-unless apartheid ends.

"South Africa is the Saudi Arabia of minerals," according to Durning. "But, because mining is the backbone of the embattled apartheid economy, the industry is little regulated. Black townships and squatter settlements bear the brunt of mining's environmental ills, drinking contaminated water and breathing polluted air.

"Blacks also suffer underground. For every ton of gold South Africa extracts, a black miner dies in an accident that would have been unlikely in other countries. Asbestos miners labor in similarly perilous conditions."

Air Pollution Now Threatening Health Worldwide

Humanity is losing the battle for clean air. Despite decades of efforts to combat it, air pollution is taking a growing toll on human health, the environment, and the economy, according to a new Worldwatch Institute study.

Water Scarcities, Irrigation Setbacks Threaten Food Supplies

Worsening shortages of fresh water along with rising costs of irrigation are placing global food supplies in jeopardy, according to a new study from the Worldwatch Institute, a research organization in Washington, D.C.
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