Worldwatch in the News

Selected news clips from around the world with mentions of the Worldwatch Institute.

Food Prices Soaring Worldwide

From subsistence farmers eating rice in Ecuador to gourmets feasting on escargot in France, consumers worldwide face rising food prices in what analysts call a perfect storm of conditions.

From subsistence farmers eating rice in Ecuador to gourmets feasting on escargot in France, consumers worldwide face rising food prices in what analysts call a perfect storm of conditions.

Earth 2050: Population Unknowable?

Andrew Revkin's Dot Earth blog delves into the uncertainty of population growth with Worldwatch Vice President of Programs, Robert Engelman.

Andrew Revkin's Dot Earth blog delves into the uncertainty of population growth with Worldwatch Vice President of Programs, Robert Engelman.

http://www.worldwatch.org/node/add/story

Business Rethinks Green Rules: Sydney Morning Herald, January 10

Climate change is dramatically rewriting the rules for business, investors and consumers worldwide, affecting more than $100 billion in annual capital flows, a new report says.

Climate change is dramatically rewriting the rules for business, investors and consumers worldwide, affecting more than $100 billion in annual capital flows, a new report says.

China poised to be world leader in renewable energy, expert predicts: AFP, January 9

China is poised to become a global leader in renewable energy in the next few years, the head of environmental research group Worldwatch said Wednesday.

China is poised to become a global leader in renewable energy in the next few years, the head of environmental research group Worldwatch said Wednesday.

Report predicts wave of green tech: BBC News, January 9

Entrepreneurs and investors are 'inventing' a new sustainable global economy, according to an environmental research group. 

Entrepreneurs and investors are 'inventing' a new sustainable global economy, according to an environmental research group. 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7179047.stm

Seeds of a Better Farm Bill, New York Times

Worldwatch Senior Researcher Brian Halweil and Environmental Defense's Glenda Neff sound off on New York's best hope for salvaging the farm bill in Sunday's New York Times.

Whether you’re a farmer or, more likely, just someone who eats food, you should be disappointed with the farm bill, the five-year, multibillion-dollar piece of legislation being debated in the Senate. Luckily for New Yorkers, their best hope of salvaging it may lie with their state senator, Charles Schumer.

Climate Change: The Skunk at His Own Garden Party

IPS
After years of denial, the U.S. White House-sponsored summit on climate change ended Friday with President George W. Bush admitting that global warming was real and humans were responsible and asking for heads of state to join him at yet another summit next year (when his presidency ends).

It's doubtful if anyone of consequence will attend that future gab-fest since President Bush continues to push voluntary cuts to greenhouse gas emissions when the rest of the world, including much of the business sector, has already said that approach simply doesn't work.

"President Bush has so little credibility on climate change," said Chris Flavin, president of the Worldwatch Institute, a U.S.-based environmental group.

Earth's "vital signs" in bad shape: report

Reuters
More wood was removed from forests in 2005 than ever before, one of many troubling environmental signs highlighted on Thursday in the Worldwatch Institute's annual check of the planet's health.

The Washington-based think tank's "Vital Signs 2007-2008" report points to global patterns ranging from rising meat consumption to Asian economic growth it says are linked to the broader problem of climate change.

Three-quarters of world's fish stocks depleted: report

ABC News, Australia

An environmental report has found three-quarters of the world's fish stocks have been over-exploited, mainly by commercial fishing.

The Worldwatch Institute study says declaring marine parks may be the only way to reverse a big decline in fish stocks across the world.

Swimming in Prosperity

Forbes

Asia's fishery industry is awash with growth, opportunity and risk.

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